Jascha Schmitz: Report on the conference – “Data for History 2021” – Day 7 (30 June 2021)

banner_data_for_history_2021

Panel Discussion

The last session of the Data for History Conference 2021 was a panel discussion between Ariana Ciula (King’s College London), Francesca Tomasi (University of Bologna), Harald Sack (Leibniz Institute for Information Infrastructure Karlsruhe) and Francesco Beretta (University of Lyon) on ‘Historical data and interoperability / Quo vadis interoperability’. The opening speech was held by one of the conference’s co-hosts, Torsten Hiltmann (Humboldt University of Berlin), who also took on the role of moderator for the following discussion.

„Jascha Schmitz: Report on the conference – “Data for History 2021” – Day 7 (30 June 2021)“ weiterlesen

Jascha Schmitz, Anna Grönig: Report on the conference – “Data for History 2021” – Day 7 (30 June 2021)

banner_data_for_history_2021

Session 13 – Integrating Different Medialities

Øyvind Eide and Zoe Schubert (University of Cologne) opened with a presentation on their project Kompakkt, entitled „Space, time, and agents in theatre: Digital documentation of the transience of performances through theatrical agents in time and space“.
First, Øyvind Eide introduced the main features of the meaning of space in theatre: While in the text spatiality is represented by linguistic expressions, in performance both the existing spatiality of the stage (and beyond) and linguistic expressions represent space. Hence, concerning theatre, different forms of documentation are necessary for both categories. Many decisions have to be made and ways found to encircle the non-existent centre of documentation, the performance itself, in order to make it part of a (theatre) collection. 
Secondary objects and materials are used for this, such as notes, drawings, audio and video recordings. Digital methods now offer the possibility to make these objects/artifacts more available, describable and linkable.
To this end, they have developed Kompakkt, an online repository where artifacts used in performances are digitally available and explorable. For this purpose, they used a selection of artifacts from the theatre collection of the University of Cologne.

„Jascha Schmitz, Anna Grönig: Report on the conference – “Data for History 2021” – Day 7 (30 June 2021)“ weiterlesen

Julia Pabst, Anna Grönig: Report on the conference – “Data for History 2021” – Day 6 (23 June 2021)

banner_data_for_history_2021

Session 12 – Data from Annotated Texts

The sixth day of the Data for History conference started with Cristina Vertan’s (University of Hamburg) presentation „Representing vague and uncertain historical data on places people and events in historical texts – a case-study of historical texts of Dimitrie Cantemir“. The main focus was on the texts and translations of the universal researcher Dimitrie Cantemir, who was the only one to write a history on the Balkan region from a western perspective. The original work was written in Latin and translated into other languages only in the 18th century. Since there was no word for word translation, the project is now dedicated to such translations.  It combines hermeneutic methods with the methods of computer science. There are three directions of investigation: reliability, consistency and vagueness. First, a model with a knowledge base was developed, which also takes into account vague or uncertain places and persons. After that, the detection was done, e.g. to annotate linguistic marks for uncertain places in each of the available languages, followed by the visualization. One of the central points of the modeling was the creation of an ontology. With this ontology, one can now answer queries about the translations and texts, while taking ambiguities into account. The presentation highlighted the complexity of working with texts and translations.

„Julia Pabst, Anna Grönig: Report on the conference – “Data for History 2021” – Day 6 (23 June 2021)“ weiterlesen

Manuel Burghardt: Text Reuse Detection in “The Undiscovered Country” – Computergestützte Streifzüge durch die Ländereien unentdeckter Shakespeare-Referenzen

Shakespeare ist überall. Intertextuelle Bezüge zu den Werken des ‚eternal bard‘ finden sich über alle zeitlichen und medialen Grenzen hinweg und machen ihn nicht nur zum meistzitierten und meistaufgeführten Autor aller Zeiten, sondern auch zum am meisten untersuchten Autor der Welt. Wenngleich unzählige Studien zur Shakespeare’schen Intertextualität einzelne Aspekte seines Werkes bislang mittels close reading untersucht haben, so gibt es doch immer noch keinen Überblick, keine systematische Landkarte intertextueller Shakespeare-Referenzen für größere Textkorpora.

„Manuel Burghardt: Text Reuse Detection in “The Undiscovered Country” – Computergestützte Streifzüge durch die Ländereien unentdeckter Shakespeare-Referenzen“ weiterlesen

Julia Pabst, Anna Grönig: Report on the conference – “Data for History 2021” – Day 5 (16 June 2021)

banner_data_for_history_2021

Keynote #2

The fifth day of the Data for History conference started with the keynote Social Semantic Annotation: Linking People and Places in the Pelagios Digital Ecosystem by Rebecca Kahn (University of Vienna). This talk was about the experience from the Pelagios project on building a method and a community in and around the use of linked geo-data for working with historical sources. Rebecca Kahn’s talk focused not on the methods of the project, but on the community and network around it.
Pelagios is a Network that connects a method and a community with digital resources. Part of the project consists of providing the Recogito and Peripleo, a search engine for Linked Data.
Pelagios consists of four different founders, an investigative team and many other people involved from different directions (GLAM, students, etc.) The Network was built on the premise of openness regarding data, technology and the community.

„Julia Pabst, Anna Grönig: Report on the conference – “Data for History 2021” – Day 5 (16 June 2021)“ weiterlesen

Lars-Erik Brandt, Diana Vegner: Report on the conference – “Data for History 2021” – Day 2

banner_data_for_history_2021

Session 4 – Modelling the Analyses Lars-Erik Brandt

The first presentation of Session 4: Modelling the Analyses was a project of Helen Mair Rawsthorne from the Université Gustave Eiffel with the title “Analysing 18th century hydrographic data: a campaign in the Bay of Biscay, 1750-1751”. The approach focused on maritime maps from the early modern period in France. At that time, a research project was to investigate the depth of the Bay of Biscay at different points and to map the entire bay with information on the depth of the sea and certain characteristics, such as sediment species. Helen Rawsthorne examined not only the maps themselves, created during this campaign, but also the written notes on the various measuring points. The sources are well preserved, since the maps were used by the people of that time in everyday life. The research question was to compare the quality of the results from the historical measurements with modern ones and thus to show how accurate the historical approach was. „Lars-Erik Brandt, Diana Vegner: Report on the conference – “Data for History 2021” – Day 2“ weiterlesen

Julia Pabst, Anna Grönig: Report on the conference “Data for History 2021” – Day 1

banner_data_for_history_2021

The conference was opened by a short introduction by Torsten Hiltmann (HU Berlin), who, in cooperation with Francesco Beretta and Vincent Alamercery (LARHRA Lyon) is the organizer of this event. He offered a brief overview of the still young history of the consortium and introduced the overall aim of the conference, which is to promote exchange within the broader community and to create more stable structures for the future development of the consortium. Even though it can only take place online this year due to the Corona pandemic, it was important to preserve the core idea of the meeting. Therefore, all changes from the initial plans, such as a new schedule spread over 7 weeks and Airmeet as the platform for the conference, were chosen to assure exactly that: namely communication, exchange and discussions among like-minded people facing the same challenges if it comes to the modelling of data in historical research. „Julia Pabst, Anna Grönig: Report on the conference “Data for History 2021” – Day 1“ weiterlesen

Conference announcement: Data for History 2021 – Modelling Time, Places, Agents

banner_data_for_history_2021

From May 19 to June 30, 2021, the Data for History consortium, an international community that aims to improve the interoperability of historical data on the semantic web, together with the Chair of Digital History and the Laboratoire de Recherche Historique Rhône-Alpes, will host the virtual conference Data for History 2021: Modelling Time, Places, Agents via Airmeet.

With three keynotes, around 30 paper presentations, a poster session and a final panel discussion, the conference will focus on the exchange of current ideas and practices regarding the modelling of time, space and agents as historical data. A topic that is all the more important since we are currently at a turning point in historical research:

„Conference announcement: Data for History 2021 – Modelling Time, Places, Agents“ weiterlesen

Anselm Küsters: Answering Bork with Distant Reading: A Corpus-Linguistic Analysis of EU Competition Law and Policy (1961-2021)

In an often-quoted passage from his magnus opus The Antitrust Paradox, Robert Bork underscored the role of objectives, ideas, and beliefs behind the operation of any competition law system: ‘Antitrust policy,’ Bork wrote, ‘cannot be made rational until we are able to give a firm answer to one question: What is the point of the law – what are its goals? Everything else follows from the answer we give.’ This paper answers Bork’s question for the European case by analysing all 11,000 European competition law decisions and judgments between 1961 and 2021 through corpus-linguistic methods that exemplify a distant reading approach. Overall, the results suggest that the initial ‘ordoliberalisation’ of European competition law was followed by a later ‘neoliberalisation.’ „Anselm Küsters: Answering Bork with Distant Reading: A Corpus-Linguistic Analysis of EU Competition Law and Policy (1961-2021)“ weiterlesen

Silke Schwandt: Digitale Methoden in der mittelalterlichen Rechtsgeschichte – Menschen vor Gericht in englischen County Courts

In der Forschung zur mittelalterlichen Rechtsgeschichte sind digitale Methoden gar nicht mehr neu. Es gibt zahlreiche Repositorien rechtlicher Quellencorpora – in Form von digitalisierten Archivbeständen, Volltextdigitalisaten juristischer Literatur etc. Insbesondere auf dem Feld der digitalen Editionen ist die Forschung zur Geschichte der Vormoderne seit mehreren Jahren so etwas wie eine Vorreiterin. Wie nutzt man nun aber diese Quellencorpora? Welche digitalen Analysewerkzeuge eignen sich zur Beantwortung der Fragen, die wir als Historiker*innen an das Material stellen? „Silke Schwandt: Digitale Methoden in der mittelalterlichen Rechtsgeschichte – Menschen vor Gericht in englischen County Courts“ weiterlesen